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Utilities - Water Department

Water/Sewer Billing Office, 333 W. Ellsworth St., Midland, MI 48640 Phone: 989-837-3341
Water Treatment Plant, 2607 Bay City Rd., Midland, MI 48642 Phone: 989-837-3515
Email: water@midland-mi.org

Map to Water / Sewer Billing Office         Map to Water Treatment Plant

Frequently Asked Questions

Health

What if I have special health needs?

What is the hardness level of Midland’s water?

What is the pH of Midland’s water?

Is it safe to drink water that contains chlorine?

How much fluoride is in Midland’s drinking water?

What are the white particles coming from my tap?

Do I need to drink bottled water?

Concerned about your sodium intake?

Water System Problems

What causes discolored water?

Do I need to use a "treatment" device in my home or business?

How much water does the average person use at home per day?

Does a little leak in my house really waste water?

How do I check for and identify leaks?

The water is not flowing properly to my home. Who should I call at the Water Department to get help?

Who do I call to report a water main break or other potential water system-related emergency?

Why is there a black ring inside my toilet bowl?

Payment Options

Can I pay my water/sewer bill over the Internet?

What other options are available for paying my water/sewer bill?

History

Where does our water come from?

What is the Saginaw-Midland Municipal Water Supply Corporation?

Answers

What if I have special health needs?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons, such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. Environmental Protection Agency/Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or by e-mailing sdwa@epa.gov.

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What is the hardness level of Midland's water?

Midland’s drinking water is moderately soft with an average hardness of 104 (ppm as CaCO3). This level of hardness is approximately six grains per gallon.

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What is the pH of Midland's water?

The average pH of water in Midland is 8.2.

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Is it safe to drink water that contains chlorine?

Yes. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) have established that it is safe to drink water with chlorine at a level established to protect the water as it moves through the water mains and out the tap.

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How much fluoride is in Midland's drinking water?

Approximately 0.7 ppm of fluoride is contained in Midland’s water.

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What are the white particles coming from my tap?

The white particles are most likely either calcium carbonate deposits (scale) or the result of a deteriorating hot water heater plastic “dip tube”. Contact the Midland Water Treatment Plant at 989-837-3341 for more information.

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Do I need to drink bottled water?

It is unnecessary for our customers to go to the extra expense of buying bottled water in order to have safe drinking water. Bottled water costs more than $1 a gallon, and water from a Midland tap costs less than a tenth of a cent per gallon. In addition, the public health standards for water from municipal water supplies are higher than those for bottled water.

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Concerned about your sodium intake?

Water from the Midland Water Treatment Plant has an average of 5 milligrams of sodium per liter. Midland's water is very low in sodium. Individuals who use water softeners actually add sodium in the process to remove hard-water minerals.

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What causes discolored water?

Discolored water is often the result of rusting galvanized pipe in home plumbing systems. Normally, the water clears after running a bit. Sometimes, water mains may become scoured from firefighting activities or a main break. Iron causes the discoloration; it is not a health risk.

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Do I need to use a "treatment" device in my home or business?

The water we deliver to our customers is safe to drink as determined by EPA and MDEQ standards. In-home “treatment” systems may cost several hundred dollars plus the cost of frequent filter changes. The extra expense is unnecessary as a matter of safety. If our customers wish to install filtration equipment, it is a matter of personal preference.

We encourage those who choose to use on-site equipment to change the filter as often as the manufacturer recommends, because the filters are an excellent breeding ground for bacteria. People with specific health concerns may wish to seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

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How much water does the average person use at home per day?

Estimates vary, but each person uses about 80-100 gallons of water per day. The largest use of household water is to flush the toilet. Taking showers and baths also accounts for a large percentage of household use of City water.

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Does a little leak in my house really waste water?

It’s not the little leak that wastes water – it is the little leak that keeps on leaking that wastes water. And, the fact that the leak is so little means that maybe it is being ignored.

How can a little leak turn into a big waste? Many toilets have a constant leak – somewhere around 22 gallons per day. This translates into about 8,000 gallons per year of wasted water – water that could be saved. Or think of a leaky water line coming into your house. If it leaks 1 gallon of water every 10 minutes, that means that you are losing (and paying for) 144 gallons per day, or 52,560 gallons per year.

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How do I check for and identify leaks?

Areas that might be using water continually because of a leak are as follows:

  • toilets

  • drippy faucets

  • clothes washers

  • dishwashers

  • some humidifiers

  • some disposals

  • water evaporator-type air conditioners

  • lawn sprinkling systems

  • hoses left on and connected to the sill cock

To test toilets for leaks first, remove tank-mounted cleaners and flush until all coloring is gone from inside the tank and bowl or basin of the toilet. Then add 40 to 50 drops of food coloring (blue, red or green) to a glass of warm water, and then carefully pour it into the tank, stirring it to mix the food coloring throughout the tank. Check the toilet bowl periodically over the next two hours. Food coloring in the bowl indicates a leak.

Another way to check for water leaks is to read the water meter in your home and write down the numbers, including the number to which the needle is pointing. After two hours of not using any water in the house, read the water meter again and compare the numbers to the original reading from the beginning of the test. If the needle has moved or any of the readings have changed, that means that water has passed through the meter even though no water faucets were turned on or toilets flushed, etc., during that time. In this case, a change in the needle's position on the meter indicates a leak or open valve somewhere in the home.

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The water is not flowing properly to my home. Who should I call at the Water Department to get help?

Contact Water Distribution at 989-837-6950 with any questions about the water flow to your home.

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Who do I call to report a water main break or other potential water system-related emergency?

The City of Midland Water Treatment Plant responds to emergencies related to the City's water system (such as water main breaks) 24 hours a day. If you have a water system emergency, please call the Water Plant at 989-837-3515.

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Why is there a black ring inside my toilet bowl?

There is no relation between the water being delivered to your household and the black ring that occasionally appears in your toilet bowl. This is actually mildew that forms due to room temperature, facility usage and lighting. It is suggested that you use a chlorine-based bowl cleaner plus more ventilation during showers to help reduce this problem.

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Can I pay my water/sewer bill over the Internet?

Yes. Use the City's Online Water/Sewer Bill Payment website to pay using select credit or debit cards, or electronic checks.

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What other options are available for paying my water/sewer bill?

City water customers can pay by mail or in person at the Water Billing Office, located on the first floor of Midland City Hall, 333 W. Ellsworth St., Midland, MI 48640.

Another payment option is through the Auto-Pay - Automatic Funds Withdrawal Program. This is a free electronic funds transfer program that provides a secure, reliable way to pay your water/sewer bill from the checking or savings account of your choosing. To enroll in the Auto-Pay program, click here.

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Where does our water come from?

Midland has received its source water supply from Lake Huron since 1948. To find out more about where the City's water supply comes from, click here.

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What is the Saginaw-Midland Municipal Water Supply Corporation?

The Saginaw-Midland Municipal Water Supply Corporation is a cooperative venture between the cities of Saginaw and Midland that brings Lake Huron water to both communities via 65 miles of underground infrastructure. Click on the above link to view the path that the water travels from Lake Huron to the two cities.

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